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and colombia export agreements. hopefully our bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bipartisan bill received such broad support from republicans and democrats in the house, getting 365 votes, and i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to now support this legislation before us. thank you, madam president. i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: madam president, i understand now under the existing unanimous consent agreement that we are going to be proceeding to debate a judge. i would ask unanimous consent that immediately after the disposition of that nomination that i be the first democratic senator recognized when we return to the pending trade bill. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 676, which the clerk will report.
the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally syria. where are they? >> secretary clinton met with the foreign minister of russia a couple of days ago. obviously russia has backed another loser, its propensity in these things. i think they even see this now. probably the best-case scenario is there's some sort of soft landing where assad is offered an exile deal, gets out of the picture. and then you start the retribution massacres and it could turn into something extremely ugly. the hope is russia will get on board and be constructive. the foreign minister said good things but we'll see what russia does. >> what does an intervention looks like? >> if chemical weapons are used, i think it looks a lot like the air strikes in libya. you have to destroy some of those major stockpiles of chemical weapons. if they start to lose control and there are fores that hezbollah might get ahold of them, you might see some special forces on the ground. the idea of chemical weapons, especially f
this compliance. russia appears to want to limit both the influence of the united states and turkey in the south caucasus, but it is unclear to me whether they also seek to minimize iranian's influence. i have followed with great interest turkey's attempts. and my sense is that such a step holds the greatest potential to improve both stability and prosperity in the region. lifting our means isolation would not only allow for greater independence from iranian and russian influence, it would also be mutually beneficial for turkey and her meaning and a number of ways. i'm interested in hearing the panels perspectives on whether this is an issue that turkish and a meaning governments might be able to reengage in. but we can all agree on is this, as i conclude, is that it is in no one's interest to see a nuclear-armed iran. and i look forward to exploring how the south caucasus region and help the united states and europe prevent this outcome. we cannot have that as an outcome. i anxiously await hearing the testimony of our witnesses, again, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure and i think that this he
for peace talks as the violence escalates. the country's ally, russia, is inviting the leader of syria's opposition to visit moskow for the first time but that offer turned down. some interesting developments here. let's get them from leland vittert live in our mideast bureau. leland? >> reporter: jon, no one really views russia as an honest broker here especially the rebels who for so long seen russia side with pat assad in this conflict. they don't really want to deal with the russians, hence turning down the invitation. the rebels now think time is on their side. the momentum is on the battlefield has shifted. for so long the rebels were outgunned and outmaneuvered. they hold major parts of northern part of the syria and major population centers in the center of the country that president assad up till now had control. one rebel fighter said we'll fight all the way to president assad's palace. the rebels don't see a reason to negotiate while president assad is in power. the while the offer from the russians may not be so significant is the fact they're making it is significant. russ
as pntr, with russia and moldova and to update russian human rights legislation. we have to take many difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them. in fact, this is a rare opportunity to pass a good bill that we all can agree on. pntr is good for united states jobs. russia is a fast-growing market. when russia joined the w.t.o. in august, it opened its markets to the other 155 members of the w.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for the
. but there is a vote going on on the senate floor a vote on the russia trade bill, that's under way. it may postpone senator mccain's comments just a bit. you heard senator reid, leader reid, asked about the resignation of jim demint who announced he's resigning to take over the conservative think tank the heritage foundation. he'll resign effective january 1. he was first elected to the senate in 2004. the senate is in today. they're voting on the russia trade bill. they have a couple of judicial nominations as well, after that, the -- legislatively that ought to do it for the senate. we're staying live here in the senate radio and tv gallery, expecting senator john mccain to come out shortly for a briefing. later at about 1:30, we'll take you live to a conference looking a at the arab spring and nuclear proliferation and later at 4:30 here in washington, the lighting of the national christmas tree, that's coming up for you this afternoon on c-span. the senate is in, votes under way on the russia trade bill, that's live on c-span 2. >> we expect senator mccain to be delayed just a little bit buzz o
? senator clinton -- secretary clinton meeting with russia, what can we do and what's the next step if they don't listen. >> it's a complex world the president is going to lead in. >> can i enter, you cover these issues all the time and did a lead story on nightly news on this topic. the question fors the president is ultimately what do you do when your foreign policy has been premised on bringing american troops home, at a time when american power and influence is needed particularly in the middle east, but there are no easy answers. this i think is what sort of calls out for an obama doctrine in a second term. he doesn't seem to have one at the moment which is a big issue. >> and doesn't have a foreign policy team yet. he's still wrestling with those decisions. more on that to come. david gregory, thank you very much. chris cizilla. coming up sunday on "meet the press," the fiscal cliff debate. the latest between house republican whip kevin mccarthy and assistant senate majority leader dick durbin, the two men who have been at the table. congress hearing from all sides on the fisc
obama signed a new stark treatment. an agreement between united states and russia to reduce the number of nuclear weapons in each country's arsenal. he called that his top national security priority and he got the senate to ratify it. it's hard to put a bigger exclamation point on a policy than the way he's talked about nuclear disarmament. and counterproliferation. keeping the world safe not just from nuclear weapons, but nuclear material falling into the wrong hands. it's still this underappreciate ed it thing about what is important to him. and also how long it's been important to him. today president obama underscored how seriously he's taken this issue from the beginning of his career in a speech praising in part republican richard lugar's work on nuclear weapons and nuclear material as senator lugar prepares to leave washington after decades. >> it was dick who took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia and ukraine. i remember walking through one facility. i started leaning in for a closer look and one of the workers said don't touch that orange stuff. it it turned o
with russia's top diplomat and with the special envoy to the syrian crisis who said nothing sensational came out of it. but clinton and the russian foreign minister did agree to try to find some, quote, creative ways to end the bloodshed. and it looks like russia's stedfast support for assad could be nearing its end. the influential russian lawmaker who is tight with vladimir putin said, quote, we have shared and do share the opinion that the existing government in syria should carry out its functions, but time has shown its task is beyond its strength. back in washington, a spokesman for secretary clinton warned of the perils that the syrian people would confront even in a post assad era. >> we know these groups, al-qaeda and others, troy to take advantage of the environment assad has fostered over the last year or so. it is important that they -- that the syrian people get a government out of all of this that is representative of their desires and as separations. they -- aspirations. they don't want to trade one for the other. >> that has been a concern for u.s. policy makers in all of the
, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but having russia back them would be a determined outcome made by the promise of president obama in dealing with russia after winning a second term as he remarked to the russian president thinking they were off microphone as they met in south korea back in march. >> after my election, i have more flexibility. >> i understand. i just need permission -- lou: a full report on the disturbing turn of events in syria and the
, particularly with russia in terms of getting that message out that that's a red line that can't be passed. >> how essential is russia being involved? >> russia is key. russia has been backing assad diplomatically at the u.n. and has deep ties into assad's regime. if they begin to walk away from syria and there appear to be signals that they are distancing themselves, that will put pressure on those around assad to make sure that they do not take assad's lead in potentially using these weapons and helpses move towards the resolution of this. >> you have a ground strategy perhaps being considered and then you have an air strategy. air seems to be the one that's being discussed most because it can be most surgical. is there such a thing when we're talking about chemical weapons as being a surgical military option? >> there is not a clear surgical military it would take 75,000 troops to secure the sites that we know of, dropping ordinance on-sites that have sarin and even mustard gas and other nerve agents can be very damaging, get blown away in the wind. it's not clear this is surgical. the
is watching very closely. >> secretary clinton, in fact, just wrapped up an important meeting in russia, syria's strongest ally. "time" magazine's jim frederick will join us live about the latest developments. we know president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone last night, talked a lot about that even though we don't know what they discussed. the first read team says a fiscal cliff deal is in sight. what do they think the big deal will be? join our conversation on twitter. find us at @tamronhall a and @newsnation. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't re
for another addition for the family from russia in the coming year. >> this is our crib for our son. >> reporter: they are just one of hundreds caught in a international political showdown. president vladimir putin was defiantly saying he planned to sign the ban on adoptions to the u.s. the country's legislative branch had just passed the bill unanimously. this was russia's response to president obama's anticorruption law that denies russian officials from getting u.s. visas if they were associated with human rights violations. >> it's very tragic that these children are potentially going to fall victim to really the senseless politics. >> reporter: lauren koch with the national council for adoption says, with 700,000 russian orphans, the kids are the ones caught in the political web. >> most of them have been matched with children. they consider these children part of their families already. they have introduced, you know, them via pictures and other methods to their siblings here in the united states. and it's really heartbreaking. >> bring it over here so we can see it. >> repor
report in minutes. heather: and new controversy over a move by russia's president that critics say is playing politics with the lives of orphans. what it could mean for americans who want to adopt overseas. our legal panel debates. i greg: welcome back. jenna: a fox extreme weather alert. this is no system bringing heavy wind and rain and snow to the northeast for dumping as much as 1.5 feet of snow on new york and pennsylvania. after devastating parts of the golf coast with tornadoes speak to the system is moving slowly north. but don't put away the snow shovels yet. there is another storm on the way. jenna: maria molina joins us with the very latest. reporter: you guys are right. we have another snow system that will dump a lot more snow over the northeast, and it actually produced tornadoes on christmas day. you sure you guys that this was historical. there are lots of city scenes of 14 inches of snow. across parts of upstate new york, we have reports of snow coming down out there still. our current storm or an excellent system is starting to take shape, producing areas of light
.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relationship between the united states and russia on this particular question where they have in a sense -- they are very precise about what they say and they say they are opposed to somebody coming into the country. they're not, as they say, wedded to the assad government. >> that's right. they've taken a different position over the last several months in they're not necessarily wedded to that government. however syria remains the largest arms customer for russian weapons exports. the russians use a military base, a naval base on the syrian coast so they were very important in that sense. but russia obviously wants to maintain influence in the middle east and through syria and if they can't do it through assad regime, perhaps another regime that would still be willing to deal with them could be acceptable. >> ro
an indication that russia is finally facing reality and let's hope that this will lead to a reconfigure rags of the russian position. secretary clinton met with -- it may be that the united states and russia will now have an opportunity to work together. if russia could try to influence assad to leave as quickly as possible, that would certainly help the situation where too many people are being killed, and both russia and the united states have an interest in making sure that the chemical weapons stocks in syria don't fall into the hands of a radical islamist group or terrorist group which could happen in the event of the fall of the assad government, so american and russian interests may be converging at the end of this phase of the syrian conflict more than they were certainly, say, a year ago when russia was an unstinting supporter of the assad regime. >> nicolas burns, ending on an up note. thank you very much. >> good to see you. this just in. president obama moments ago outside the white house walking over to blair house talked about the state of the fiscal cliff talks in answer to a
russia as russia's president signs an adoption ban. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months today. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> nasty, nasty, nasty winter storm has eased, but it left a lot of the u.s. covered with snow. maine was the last to feel the brunt of the snowstorm, which hammered the midwest and south just this week. some areas of maine saw up to ten inches of snow overnight, forcing state offices to close. the bad weather not over yet. northeast bracing for more sn
to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue we have is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapons issue and he backed off. but now he's back at it again. >> reporter: if assad does leave the immediate problem for the international community is who will take over in syria. then another key issue is how and who will secure the chemical weapons? bill: we are awaiting word from the pentagon and when that happt to you. martha: sarin gas is one of the world's most dangerous chemical weapons. experts say it has 500 times as toxic quality as cyanide does. 100 milligrams, which is one drop, can kill the average person in minutes if he or she is not given an immediate antedote. bill: syria depend on money from its oil exports. 9% of which are purchased by e
rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to happen to them. it's very sad because the parents and children have had numerous visits to russia by the parents. the russians have put them through the loops to see the u.s. governm says it will fight to see that these cases come together. but the law is not clear at this point what is going to happen. heather:
the syria crisis at another country. >> yes. the secretary directed her comments to russia. she emphasized that the stain legs of these patriot systems in turkey is not meant to destabilize nato's already uneasy relationship with moscow. back here at state chided the russians for skipping upcoming crisis meeting on the syrian conflict. >> we want to see obviously, you know, russia come around to the point of view of the international community with regard to what's happening in syria. you know, we want to work with russia as we have said many times from this podium on the basis of the geneva action group's communication. >> clinton is expected to meet with her russian counterpart sometime in the next 48 hours, shep. >> shepard: meantime syrian rebels are taking their fight to the capital of damascus. move aimed at putting additional pressure of regime and hitting the heart of president assad's power. that strategy is coming at a bloody cost. witnesses say a mortar slammed into a ninth grade classroom in a damascus suburb. state media early reported 30 dead. killed 13 children and a teacher
just announced the u.s. and russia have agreed to support mediation efforts with all parties in syria to bring about a political transition in that country but she said syrian president bashar assad must leave power to ensure a democratic future for the country. clinton has been meeting with russia's foreign minister. they had been disagreeing on how to address the conflict in syria, but there's a new sense of urgency as president's assad's regime appears desperate. >> we remain very concerned very concerned that as the opposition advances in particular on damascus that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> in washington, arizona senator john mccain said the u.s. should consider all options to prevent chemical attacks in syria including military intervention. >> as for the crisis in cairo, president obama has made a phone call to egyptian president mohammed morsi. he expressed concerns about the deaths and injuries of protesters outside morsi's palace. demonstrators are upset about the new unrestricted powers morsi gave himself. >>> looks like authorities
rights and supporters say boosts egypt's political stability. >>> and russia's upper house of parliament has approve adverse hal measure banning address adoption of russian children by americans. the legislation goes to putin for signing. this move is seen as retaliation for a law president obama signed earlier this month imposing travel and human rights restrictions. and i'll have a full report on this story later in our 6:00 p.m. hour. every year they have about 1,000 children adopted from russia by americans, but all of that could be put on hold. and it's a unclear also what's going to happen to the cases pending. but again, we'll have much more on the story coming up at 6:00 so people can tune in again. >> can't wait to see it. thanks so much. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, a pair of wounded firefighters. welcome to our viewers around the world. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's heart if the dealt thank you from survivors of a christmas eve shooting. j the firefighters had just arrived at a burning home when a sniper opened fire severely woundi
last night, russia's lower house of parliament has adopted a bill that bans americans from adopting russian children. pretty important when you consider that more than 45,000 u.s. adoptions came from russia over the last 12 years. the bill now goes to the upper house of russia's parliament for a vote next week. if it passes there, president vladimir putin will pass or veto the legislation. >>> it's now been 505 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back in the stock market doesn't like washington's fiscal cliff fight. all three of the major indices closed lower today by nearly 1%. >>> our fourth story "outfront," a day of mourning. one week after 27 people were shot and killed in newtown, connecticut, communities across the nation paid tribute with a moment of silence. the tributes began at 9:30 this morning, the same time those first 911 calls came in to report the shooting last friday. firefighters stood solemnly in the rain as they paused to remember the 20 children and six adults who were gunned down at sandy hook elementary school. more tha
saws russia because they grow during the war and the soviet union, don't forget the arm themselves across the mountains and we make themselves. it's an extraordinary story. migration and reconstruction and dedication of the people and of the losses of the soviets with this 22 or 27 million the stalin's it doesn't matter they plunged into this thing and it was a crucible for them at the war. but the british churchill has a fascinating overlay on this because he has a different motive it seems. once the british islands are saved in the battle of britain his goal seems to be truly to regain the empire. he said i do not mean to dismember the british empire. and the whole -- the whole concept of going to north africa, sending troops into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the b
. russia. the blast ripped through an apartment building in the central city. officials say it happened during construction work. a gas container reportedly exploded on upper level of a 10 story building. dozens of people living nearby had to evacuate. cochings seized record cash of drugs in a mountain village. they found 15 tons of cocaine worth $450 million in an underground chamber beneath the home. traffickers had reportedly felony in the drugs from venezuela. hun hun door honduras a major shipping corridor. caught a rare chinese sturgeon. the indangerred species is said it be so old it lived among the dinosaurs. kept it in a tank where alerting police. officials released it into the sea some 15 miles offshore. belgium a new electronic christmas tree. replacing the famous fir tree. the 70-foot tall creation has led's and video production screen. for a few bucks you can climb its staircase for a full view of the famous plaza. proceeds go to a charity for the homeless and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> share the holidays with the share everything pla
, and now from n nato. what do we make of this and also the fact that russia has been helpful according to the white house, very helpful, be in trying to persuade syria that this is a red line syria should not cross? >> the noose is tightening. the russians understand the arc on assad is moving south quickly. the turks have finally requested at least defensive patriot batteries, probably patriot batteries designed to deal with missiles rather than aircraft. should they be anti-aircraft patriots you could see an offensive capacity and capability. the rebels in syria are gaining force, maybe a little more coherens to their opposition and against the backdrop of all of this you have another -- yet another report of the prospects of agents being mixed with respect to chemical weapons capacity. i think this is the red line. it's a nightmarish scenario because it would force some sort of military intervention should these chemical weapons and their deployed either artillery shells or cones, the syrians have hundreds, sarin gas, maybe various nerve agents. the united states or nato would have
countries in having a pyrotechnics display. australia, china and russia are well into 2013. we are tracking the celebrations. >> residents in samoa were among the first to welcome 2013. these to be the last but a year ago, they jumped to the west of the international dateline. the spectacular start to the new year came in sydney harbour, launched by the australian superstar, kiley been no good. -- kylie minogue. 7 tons of fireworks filled the air above sydney harbour bridge. this city's style is rather different. john yang has held what for help -- it's believed to be the first public new year celebration in north korea. burma has joined the global party. ♪ >> the end of the year would not be complete without the viral pop hit, "gangnam style" being performed with great enthusiasm. while hong kong celebrate with a virtuous so show over victoria harbor. fireworks lit up moscow's red square. in dubai, they filmed the midnight moment under the world's tallest building. the gulf states is eager to take its place among the world's best known venues for the dawn of the new year. >> no happy ne
children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set everything up and can't go pick up the kids. horrible. anyway, a maryland pizza delivery man fights off a group of attackers. his reward? a demotion. >> he sucker punched me. my glasses flew off. i dropped the
for russia to come around and pave the way to a u.n. resolution similar to that in the case of libya, do you think that that waiting will pay off? >> i don't think so. it's hard to imagine russia at this point, anyway, from my vantage point. maybe i have been proved wrong. approving of a u.n. resolution. even in the latest talks that secretary of state hillary clinton has had with the russian foreign minister, it's not like everybody is on the same page. they're not. obviously, the russians are looking at this very closely because they can see their client busard is in a very tricky situation and do they want to be on the losing side? on the same token, with the u.s. not really being involved has not really many friends on the ground in syria. what happens if bashar falls? who do you talk to and have relations with on the ground? i know they have come up with this coalition, this opposition coalition, but that, too, has yet to fully prove itself as an effective and consolidated opposition to bashar alsad. a coalition that can have his core group of defectors to break and to basically come ov
. >> kimberly: i have a quick video. time for this in russia. this is in russia. the coys are okay. it's okay. it's not animal cruelty. what happened it flipped. >> dana: that is so sad. >> bob: they were going to the meat market anyway. >> eric: how could they be okay
orphanage outside moscow, but now wonder if they'll ever see her again. russia banned adoptions to the united states last week in retaliation for a set of human rights sanctions -- citing cases of 19 russian children abused by american parents. for kendra, it's been emotional whiplash. >> you're holding your breath and feeling sick to your stomach and you can't eat and you can't sleep. and -- you just got to hold onto something. >> reporter: but after kendra appeared on "world news" last week, tonight, she's receiving an outpouring of support from some of president putin's own people. russi russians. on the same side of those american parents. many offering to help. "if you want me to get anything to polina, i will buy it on my account, no problem." one person wrote. "forgive us. we can't protect our kids from the russian government," wrote another. >> such an outpouring of love since your story, from the people of russia and it's just overwhelming to me. people that have said, you can stay at our house, what can we do? >> reporter: most of all, they urge kendra to keep fighting
is holding an unscheduled meeting in ireland with the special envoy to syria. it is a sign that russia may be switching sides to put pressure on syria to stop the fighting. margaret brennan is in dublin covering those talks. good morning, margaret. do you think this is a sign of a diplomatic breakthrough? >> reporter: norah, it's a sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. u.n. envoy to syria is flying here to dublin for this last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. russia one of syria's few remaining allies and so far have agreed to any interactions to stop the killing of thousands of people. >> charlie rose here. the reporting that they're mixing the ingredients for chemical weapons influence what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: the russian foreign minister says that the outside russian government -- syrian government assures them that they are rumors. russia wants to be part of wha
by pediatricians and used by moms decade after decade. [ humming ] >>> let's check top stories now. russia may be emerging as more of a player in efforts to end the syrian civil war. russia's foreign minister held talks on syria with his egyptian counteren part today. russia is also reaching out to a syrian opposition leader to hold the meeting. >>> the florida man known as the dinosaur smuggler is facing 17 years in prison. eric pricopi pleaded guilty to illegally buying and selling whole or partial dinosaur skeletons and slipping them through u.s. customs. sentencing is scheduled for april. the remains are being returned to mongolia. >>> a new year's resolution for drivers in chicago, use the l, because starting january 1st the city will have the most expensive parking meter rates in north america. how expensive? $6.50 per one hour in the loop. it will be the fifth year in a row that the city's meter rates have gone up. >>> the massacre at sandy hook elementary school got a lot of teachers thinking, what would they do if they found themselves in that same situation and a debate has exploded
. 7:30 a.m. sunday, right? eastern time. sanjay gupta, don't miss him. >>> russia's government trying to put the brakes on american parents adopting russian children. coming up next, the impact families here in the u.s. and really what is being done to stop this proposed ban. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> helping newtown heal. one week after the tragic school shooting at that elementary school, some people coping with unimaginable sorrow are turning to dogs. take a look. >> he's a comfort dog. you can pet him. it says right here, please pet me. a comfort dog is whatever brings comfort to other people, when they're suffering or hurting or brings happiness to people, helps people process their grief. >> it's okay, abbie. it's good girl. ye
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
to find a cure. >>> let's start this half hour with a law signed by russia's president overnight that bans adoptions by u.s. citizens. agonizing news for american couples looking to start or expand their families. nbc's michelle kosinski is here this morning with more. >> it more russian children are adopted here in america than any other country. we're talking tens of thousands of country over the last 20 years or so. as of this morning, russia has just made this illegal effective immediately in a sort of diplomatic dispute with the u.s. that seems to have very little to do with the children. they're like any proud parent. americans posting their stories of adopting russian children, showing their happiness on the internet. >> so we're leaving. >> this family traveled to russia in 2007 overjoyed to adopt ben. >> you've gotten to be a big boy. >> a head full of hair. >> i know. like daddy's. >> a relationship that took nearly a year to get started. >> it's a million pieces of paper. you laugh about it, but it really is quite an intensive process. >> now at home, ben just turned 7, very muc
as the sweetest 4-year-old boy you could ever meet. he lives in russia where the moyers visited him a few months ago with the intention of adopting him. >> we know that there are special needs children in that area of the world and that is something that we are open to and the child that we are pursing, vatalia, has down's syndrome. >> reporter: the moyers who live in georgia are facing what could be an insurmountable obstacle. president vladimir putin has indicated he will sign it into law. >> if what they say is going to happen really happens, those families are not going to be able to adopt the kids even if all the legal processes already have been in place. but much more important, let's focus on the children. what it means is those children will remain institutionalized. >> reporter: some see the russian bill as retaliation for an american law that puts restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations. according to statics by the u.s. state department, the number of russian children adopted by american couples has increased significantly in the last few years. in 2004, the number
clinton holds emergency talks with russia as u.s. officials confirm reports that the syrian military is prepared to launch chemical weapons against its own people. >> we've made it very clear what our position is with respect to chemical weapons and i think we will discuss that and many other aspects. >> the whole world is watching. the whole world is watching very closely. and the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. >> plus, sharp criticism from afghan president karzai. the exclusive nbc interview. why he says the u.s. is partly to blame for the growing instability in his country. >>> and the duchess of cambridge leaves the hospital after being treated for acute morning sickness. her royal father-in-law couldn't be happier. >> i'm not a radio station? >> grandfather, that's splendid. that's great she's getting better. >> good day, i'm chris cillizza in for andrea mitchell live in washington. behind the bluster and the rhetoric, what happens going on behind the scenes in the budget negotiations? and big breaking news in this town. senat
's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warn
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